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Tattly Temporary Tattoos - Blog

DIY Ornaments

DIY Ornaments

Apply your favorite Tattly on simple ornaments for a unique holiday gift or party activity. Here's your step-by-step guide to creating your own Tattly DIY Ornaments.  Read more

Just because your skin is covered head to toe doesn't mean you can't still have fun applying Tattly! Stick them on your favorite holiday crafts for a shiny new creation in minutes. Here's a step-by-step guide for DIY Tattly Ornaments.

DIY Ornaments

What you’ll need:

  • Ornaments with a clean and smooth surface
  • Sponge
  • Water
  • Tattly by your favorite artists!
  • Your favorite clear sealant
DIY Ornaments
Cut away the negative space, but give yourself room to hold the paper without touching the design/adhesive. Make slits to help the application cover the round surface.

DIY Ornaments

Applying to ornaments is the same as applying to skin. Instructions are on the back of every Tattly and we also have this fun video.

Don’t forget that you are working with adhesive and the designs are meant to be temporary. Handle your ornament with care and try to not touch the designs as you apply more.

DIY Ornaments

Apply your favorite clear sealant and make one for a friend! 

Featured designs: Gold Floral, T Rex, Diamonds, Rifle Paper Co.

Psst.. Metallic Tattly apply a little easier and gosh, they look good! Tattly Sheets are also ideal for this type of DIY.

 

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Tattly Artist Q&A: Stina Persson

Tattly Artist Q&A: Stina Persson

Our latest Tattly Artist Q&A is with the wonderfully talented Stina Persson, the artist behind some of our ever popular watercolor designs. Catching her on Skype on a grey Stockholm afternoon, Tattly team member Katherine chatted with Stina about her studio, working in watercolor, and her thrift-store addiction! Read more

Our latest Tattly Artist Q&A is with the wonderfully talented Stina Persson, the artist behind some of our ever popular watercolor designs. Catching her on Skype on a grey Stockholm afternoon, Tattly team member Katherine chatted with Stina about her studio, working in watercolor, and her thrift-store addiction! Scroll on to read the full Q&A.


Katherine: It looks like you have a wonderfully bright studio there.
Stina Persson: It’s bright, but messy. I should move things around. My studiomate isn’t here, so then it becomes all like this. (Stina looks around behind her and gestures to clutter which is out of sight)
K: When your studiomate’s not around there’s no one there to make sure it’s clean for, right!
S: She’s coming tomorrow though so, I better… (she runs off and shuffles some things around!)

K: You share your space with just one other, right?
S:
 My brother works with me sometimes, but then I share with this amazing interior designer. She’s a very inspirational woman. She used to have this tv show for Swedish kids where she restyled their rooms but together with them and without the parents knowing, and making it really wild. She has all these very fun, different projects. Isabelle McAllister. She has a great blog and great Instagram feed, and she’s really lovely!

Stina Persson Interview

K: So let’s start with a little about you: you’ve lived in a number of places, and you’re currently based in Stockholm. Are you originally from Sweden?
S:
 Yeah I’m a Swede, but a southern Swede, not from Stockholm.
K: What made you choose to move and study in Italy?
S:
 Coming from a very cold country I just wanted something warm and I’d studied Italian in school so it kind of made sense. My best friend wanted to study fashion design and I said “should I come with you?” and she said “this school has courses in Arts so why don’t you take one of those?” And I did.

K: You studied Fine Art in Italy, Fashion Design in Italy, and Illustration at Pratt here in New York. What lead you into watercolor illustration?
S:
 I didn’t actually do any watercolor in school. When I took the class in Illustration at Pratt, I think most illustrators back then were really jaded and kind of sad about the industry because it changed. It wasn’t so well looked upon. This was in the late ‘90s, like ‘95, ‘96, and they were all really disillusioned because they had been very good illustrators and then they didn’t have any work. So I think everything I learned in school I avoided a little bit. Then illustration picked up again and it became this very exciting thing that so many people do at this point. But watercolor, I don’t know, it comes easy to me I think. I don’t have to struggle too much. If I can choose I prefer black ink. Working with watercolor can be a slippery slope into being kitsch or too feminine or too soft. I like it more edgy and hard.

K: You can definitely see that coming across in your work. It certainly doesn’t feel soft, but instead it is quite edgy or strong, as well as being feminine. A lot of your work seems to be focused on the woman or feminine form, is there something in particular that draws you to the female/woman as a subject? 
S: 
I think the shapes of the woman are more interesting than a man. A muse is more common than a, I dunno, a muso I think. Also then you have makeup and hair, and I mean not always but often [that’s] easier to exaggerate and to work with. I think I’ve gotten a lot of work in things that are about technology or like, a car, and they want it to be more feminine, so then they ask someone like me to give it something more soft or something more feminine. It’s kind of become a niche.

Stina Persson Interview

K: You do a lot of both commercial and personal work. I’m wondering if you find there’s a difference with how you approach the two?
S:
 I think that in the beginning there was a big difference. My personal work looked one way and then my more commercial work looked a very different way. Over the years I think I’ve managed to be more happy with my commercial work, making it look more personal. And I’ve kind of become better at convincing clients that my personal way is the way I think, which is great!

K: Where do you pull inspiration from, how do you stay fresh?
S: 
As I’m getting older I think I get more inspiration from nature and its shapes. And also people-watching. (Stina makes a bit of a face, like she’s about to admit a dirty secret or indulgence) I’m a real thrift store addict. You know, old magazines, and prints, and dresses, and stuff like that. I try to stay away from looking at too many illustrators because I think that, I feel I get more inspired by artists or people who are not exactly in my field. I mean, not because people aren’t talented or to be inspired by, but I think for me, I get more material from elsewhere.

K: Being a thrift store addict, does that mean you have a large collection of stuff that you’ve picked up over the years or are you more of a looker…
S: 
Unfortunately I have lots of stuff. Like dresses. I think being a Swede with a short summer, I have way too many summery dresses and summer clothes, and like, one winter jacket!

K: Do you have any specific rituals or routines that you use to get into working each day?
S: 
Yeah I do. I go to the local coffee shop and I get my coffee. I bring my own cup because I don’t want to waste too many paper cups, and it tastes so much better. And then I listen to BBC. A lot. When they start cricket results I turn it off and get into podcasts or something like that.
K: What are your go-tos?
S:
 This American Life, This is Criminal, Reply All, Radiolab, yeah, the regular ones, I think that’s the normal bunch.

Stina Persson Interview

K: You’ve mentioned that you love working with ink at the moment. Do you have any favorite tools that you like to work with?
S:
 I like watercolor too. I mean I love color. (Turns around and looks at collection of brushes that is out of sight) I really like these inexpensive brushes because I tend to mess them up, like this bamboo pen. But I have SOO many brushes, I mean tons and tons. 
K: Do you end up keeping all of them, or is it a sort of a trade-one-out-when-you-get-a-new-one type of thing?
S: That’s what I tell myself in the store, “this time I’m going to take care of these” nah, not going to happen… but you can still keep them. I mean, like this one (picks up a brush with bent bristles, looks at it) when they’re bent they’re really not very good. You leave them in the water, you know, and then you go home and then the next day they’re like that. But yeah. I have many. But I should take better care of them (small wry smile).

K: So, how did you become involved with Tattly?
S:
 I really liked Swissmiss the blog from the very, very beginning. It’s really just Tina, and really a one man company. And she found me somehow, and put me under her wing. Her Swiss wing. And we met, I had a solo show in New York, and she came, and then she asked me, I think I was one of the first that she asked to do something for her. And that was great.

K: How did it feel to be asked to design Folk Flore, your Tattly Does Good design for The Pink Agenda?
S: 
I mean, my older sister had breast cancer, and my very best friend did, so I loved to submit something for them, and I think the images that turned out were so beautiful.

K: Which Tattly is your favorite, that isn’t one of your own?
S: 
I like them all! I prefer the black and white ones. My kids love the watch. (she starts scrolling through the designs on her computer) I like the typed ones, (while scrolling she asks if she can get back to me later) I really like those ones that are kind of like, like the anchor one, the ones that are a little more retro like… (Stina did get back to me a little later to let me know, and it’s Bear by Nic Annette Miller. That’s one of her favorites!)  

K: Thanks so much for chatting with us!
S:
 Thank you for chatting with me!
Skype: bleep bloop

Stina Persson Interview

***
Check out all of Stina’s Tattly designs here and see more of her work on her website. We also recommend following her artistic styles on Instagram
A big thanks to Isabelle for the fun photographs!
Missed a Tattly Artist Q&A? Read them all here.

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DIY Tattly Nail Art!

DIY Tattly Nail Art!

Looking to amp up your nails with a quick and easy DIY… we’ve got you covered! Our DIY nail art is super easy to nail and a great new way to wear your favorite Tattly designs. Read more

Looking to amp up your nails with a quick and easy DIY… we’ve got you covered! Our DIY nail art is super easy to nail and a great new way to wear your favorite Tattly designs.

DIY Nail Art

What you’ll need:
- Your favorite Tattly
- Scissors
- Nail polish; a base color and a clear top coat.
- Sponge and water

Prep Step: Paint nails with the color of your choice, and finish with your favorite clear top coat! 

Step One: Cut up your Tattly into small, nail sized pieces. We used Rifle Paper Co.’s Floral Heart Tattly for its small floral details, perfect for end of summer feels and Labor Day festivities. 

DIY Nail Art

Step Two: Place the cutout pieces on your nails and press down firmly. Using a wet sponge or paper towel, press on the back of the Tattly making sure to wet the paper evenly, just like you would when applying a Tattly to your skin. Make sure your base color and top coat are completely set before applying your Tattly!

DIY Nail Art

DIY Nail Art

Step Three: Peal off the paper backing and viola! Look at how great your new nail art looks! But wait, there’s one last step…

DIY Nail Art

Step Four: Apply a layer of clear polish to seal the deal and help your Tattly nail art stay put! 

DIY Nail Art

Loads of our Tattly designs make for great nail art. Our go-tos are Floral Heart, Little Marks in black or gold, the stars floating around Sad Unicorn, Knucks, and Arrows
DIY’ed your nails? We’d love to see them! Use #tattly to share your photos with us on Instagram. 

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Tattly on the Tonight Show!

Tattly on the Tonight Show!

Arguably one of the quintessential NYC experiences is taking your seat for a live-audience taping of a late-night talk show. Read more

Arguably one of the quintessential NYC experiences is taking your seat for a live-audience taping of a late-night talk show. It doesn’t get more New York than The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, broadcast live each weeknight from the Rockefeller Center. For a limited time, Hashtag the Panda became part of The Tonight Show Custom Tattly Set, available exclusively in store from The Shop at NBC Studios in 30 Rock. 

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Meet Tattly Artist Adam J. Kurtz

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J. Kurtz

Adam J. Kurtz creates “dumb little stuff that is cute and nice” and we absolutely love it! Tattly visited Adam at his studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.  Read more

Adam J. Kurtz, aka. ADAMJK, creates “dumb little stuff that is cute and nice” and we absolutely love it! Tattly visited Adam at his studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn to chat about work, his book 1 Page At A Time being translated into 15 languages, and why he calls his online store a Gift Shop.

Katherine: Let’s start with a little bit about you.

Adam J. Kurtz: I’m from Toronto originally. I moved to the Baltimore area when I was 15 and then I moved up to New York when I was 22. So, I’ve been above and below, and then sort of settled in the middle. It was a very easy choice to move here. It wasn’t that I really wanted to move to New York, but I had a couple of friends who were moving and they were like “Do you want to come?” and I thought “Okay.” The whole thing came together really quickly. It was one of those things where I woke up in July or August and I was like “I live in New York, and I’ve been living here for 6 months.” Very Weird.

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J Kurtz

K: Tell us a little about your work?

AJK: I don’t really know how to describe it. It’s very simple, text and image. 
I make dumb little stuff that is cute and nice. That truly is the best way to describe it. In my mind the whole thing is art, but other people just find it cute or see these ubiquitous images. I guess the juxtaposition of text and images is very meme like, and more recently I’ve done more of that on Instagram, where it’s a solid color with words on it. In my mind that’s like a meme, a shareable graphic that’s meant to be a self-contained thing that doesn’t require any knowledge beyond it.

K: Can we talk about your book, 1 Page At A Time, being translated into many different languages?

AJK: Yeah let’s talk about that… We’re up to 15 now. And it’s still happening. 

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J Kurtz

K: A lot of them look the same, but some of them, like the Chinese version, look SO different.

AJK: The Chinese one is SO different.

K: So how does that work?

AJK: (Adam grabs a pile of books from the other room)
They send me 5 copies of each one and I can’t throw them out because it’s my own book, but I don’t really need them. I had a font made, and in some cases I hand-wrote specifically for them. I’ve offered for almost all of the editions, and sometimes they’re just like “No, we got this.” The German one is actually really nice. I did hand-letter that one and you can see my pen tip was messed up, which I really like.

K: So you’re not hand-lettering them all?

AJK: No I think that would be insane. At first I really wanted to control every part because I’m very aggressive and protective, but I’ve sort of let go of that. I’ve learnt my lesson.

The other thing is that my work is so simple that organic hand-writing makes the whole difference, which is why I don’t use a hand-writing font and I generally draw fresh every time I do anything. I feel like I get away with saying these blunt positive sort of things only because it’s dressed up as this 2-year old girl talking to you. It’s definitely a mechanism to be able to say some of that. The new book [Pick Me Up] really hits that idea home. Those are penciled. They’re super shitty and they’re wonderful.

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J Kurtz

K: How did you become involved with Tattly?

AJK: I wanted to do a Tattly for a really long time. Everyone cool was doing one! I was at a Creative Mornings event and I was talking to Tina, and I was wearing a t-shirt. She saw my tattoos and she was like “You should do a Tattly!” and I was like “Yes, I know!

And so I literally did a Tattly of this tattoo that I have (points to Ladder) and literally a Tattly of this tattoo (points to I Feel Great). I pitched her all these tattoos I already have and she picked a couple. That’s how that happened.

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J Kurtz

K: People have had your “I Feel Great” tattooed on them for real. Have you seen it?


AJK: 
Yeah, Tina sent me that photo. When I got “I Feel Great”, it was intended as sarcasm. It’s a best friend tattoo. My friend Sarah Jean has a tattoo of a heart that says “Sad-Things” and mine is “I Feel Great”. The joke is that it’s sort of like that defense mask, but intentionally layered in that it could be one or the other. Everything I make is sort of that, where it can say what you need it to say at the time. So it was nice when Tina sent me the picture of the person who got it tattooed for real and she meant it very genuinely. It’s like a pure message and I was like “That’s really cool!” It’s so neat.

It’s really neat that people see me as this very optimistic person, because I am, but I’m also extremely realistic and negative. I’m both. I think you can’t have one without the other. I try to put both in everything.

 

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J Kurtz

K: That’s what I think makes your work so appealing.

AJK: I hope so. It sort of like if a 8-year old had lived a really long life and approached life with their very limited skill set.

K: Your work reminds me of David Shrigley’s work. You both have this charming darkness but there’s also something quite cheery about it.

AJK: That’s a tremendous compliment. I think his work is brilliant. Simple is why it works, and I’m much more commercial than that. Sometimes I think of myself as a fine artist in my head, but it’s all about the context.

Ace: Do you have a favorite Tattly that’s not your own?

AJK: I actually really like the Flora and Fauna set by Tea [Leigh] because it was such an obvious “she’s a tattoo artist so why not,” but when I think of old school Tattly, anything Jen Mussari has ever done. Jen Mussari is one of my favorite creative professionals. Very inspiring. She’s also a Baltimore girl and that’s my adopted home. Alyssa Nassner. She did some really early on. I’ve known her since we were teenagers. We both did work for this band that we were both friends with.

K: Now that you don’t have a day job, do you have routines and rituals to help you get down to work?

AJK: Yeah, I wake up in the morning. I can’t sleep in. Sleeping ‘til 10 is a victory for me. I’m usually up around 9. Generally I’ll have mail already packed and if not, I’ll be on my computer packing the morning’s orders. The post office is one block down the street, and coffee is two blocks, so I stop at the post office and go get coffee, and then come home, sit down, cycle through Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram, and figure out the day’s posts.

Then it’s getting work done as needed, whether that is boring stuff with the shop like managing wholesale, or more shop orders, emails… I do a monthly column for Design*Sponge which I was thinking about today. And then, just meeting deadlines for all these ongoing projects. Soon I’m going to hit a stretch where there’s no defined projects except for little stuff that comes up. It’ll be interesting to see what happens with that.

Meet Tattly Artist Adam J Kurtz

K: Do you think that you’ll do small things just for yourself again?

AJK: I’m almost wrapped up with a few things so last week I designed a couple of pins because I had to reorder a bunch of stuff so I just threw some of my ones in. I’ll probably start thinking about some new ones for fall. I’m not really a fall/spring person, but all my friends who have brands are, so I’m like “oh she’s doing it so I guess I should do a fall release…

Everything I make, the whole concept of my Gift Shop, and why I call it that is that I intentionally try to create items that are meant to be gifted. So, it’s sort of like this conceptual idea that this is a very simple and inexpensive thing, but when you’re gifted it by someone you love, it becomes something you really love and you save it for 10 years for no reason. As a result, I make things that 1. Have layered meanings that you could translate, and 2. Don’t have me in it.

Adam J Kurtz Mixed Feelings

For the most part they don’t have my name or artist brand on them. Because, it shouldn’t be about me at all, it should be the person who was an asshole to you, or the person who is in the shit with you, young, dumb, full of existential dread, and the person who recognized you trying… you know what I mean? And that’s part of it, it’s like I’m not actually there.

(Music switches from Alanis Morissette’s Jagged Little Pill to the new Tegan and Sara album)

I feel a lot of parallels with Tegan and Sara, and musicians like that who have been doing their thing for a long time but have to be commercial. If I did painting and I sold 3 paintings, that’s not a life. But if I want to communicate my message I can bury it in my equivalent of a pop song which would be a pin or a balloon. I want you to feel this feeling and I’m going to sneak it in there.

I think people in our roles are maybe too precious about their art. I would love to be respected, but I also want 80 thousand people to have my stupid book, and pick a page of it that they really love. This book is definitely a recover journal. It’s not subtle. The new book is really not subtle. It’s called Pick Me Up. It’s literally called “hang in there, it’s going to be fine.

I just want to make a nice thing that people who are looking for something can find something in. That’s it. 

***

You can check out more of Adam’s work on his website, his blog, and give him a follow on Instagram

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Grand Opening of Tattly Parlor!

Grand Opening of Tattly Parlor!

Located at 51 Bergen Street in Brooklyn, New York, the space included over 100 Tattly designs a bonus “tattooing” application service by appointment.  Read more

We had a blast at the grand opening of our Tattly Parlor. Located at 51 Bergen Street in Brooklyn, New York, the space included over 100 Tattly designs for sale as well as a bonus “tattooing” application service by appointment.

To celebrate the opening of the parlor, we added our first hand-poke artist Tea Leigh to our roster. Her original illustrations have been inked on fans near and far and now everyone can momentarily experience Tea’s delicate designs. 

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Notorious RBG Custom Tattly

Notorious RBG Custom Tattly

Some have committed to real tattoos of RBG, but with this Custom Tattly for Dey Street Books, the majority will definitely rule in favor of the temporary option. Read more

RBG Custom Tattly

Both were born and raised in Brooklyn. They each have a way with verse. And yes, both are notorious for their trailblazin’ ways. The Internet seems to love Ruth Bader Ginsburg as much as it loves Biggie Smalls. Some have committed to real tattoos of RBG, but with this Custom Tattly, the majority will rule in favor of the temporary option. Check out Dey Street Book's new book Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

RBG Custom Tattly

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